Critics’ Reviews

There are 28 well-researched chapters in this extensive volume. … This book is timely in opening up the wider issues of prisons and the criminal justice system as seen from an international perspective. Many of the issues pertaining to Australia find a parallel closer to home in the UK. …

The book deserves the widest possible readership, especially among those in the media and those involved in the administration of UK criminal .justice. … This book addresses debates in an intelligent, broad manner. It is essential reading for all interested in criminal justice and criminological examination of society. – Community Safety Journal (UK), Vol 5(2), April 2006

The book provides some interesting perspectives on prisons and will certainly achieve its aim as an introductory book that will raise key issues and stimulate some thought, despite the limits on its broader relevance. So, if you’ve been desperately looking for a general academic textbook on Australian prisons, particularly those in New South Wales, then call off the search. Today is your lucky day. – Prison Service Journal, No 161, September 2005

This comprehensive book of readings is particularly timely … The range of topics is ambitious, from prisonography; security in prisons, over-representation of indigenous people; managing the aged, mentally ill and women in prisons; ethics and professionalism of correctional officers to considerations of crime prevention and looking to the future. …

All of the pieces are fairly short, with most being under ten pages. The text runs to 232 pages. The format is clear and easy to follow. None of the articles is heavy with statistical tables but the references throughout to relevant statistics are generally clear, and usually form part of the narrative. These features make the book helpful and useful to students but also to busy practitioners and academics who are looking for a text to dip into for current specific pieces of information. Footnotes, when there are any, are found at the bottom of each page where they belong and the book is completed by an impressively lengthy and comprehensive bibliography. …

We can certainly recommend this book to prisoners who are interested in reading about the issues, principles and philosophical standpoints concerning the incarceration that they themselves are experiencing and we suggest it should be available in every prison library. …

We also hope this book is widely read by correctional services policy makers. – Inside Out, April 2005

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